A quick thank you!

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A quick thank you!

Postby dandruff1138 on Sun Aug 11, 2013 10:52 am

Hello! My name is Dan, I am new to the sport, have only played twice now, so VERY new. I do have a past shoulder injury that will prohibit me from ever being good, but I love getting outside and spending time with friends/family.

It is very evident many people have poured their heart and soul into some of these courses over the years. I just wanted to thank those people. Thank you!

Also, I am a very busy person as I am a returning learner college student and a professional, but my profession may actually benefit this sport. I am a professional in the green industry, a certified arborist (Professional Tree Hugger,) licensed pesticide applicator, and have many years experience with landscaping/groundskeeping, as well as a member of many organizations, certifications and licences alike. . In fact I have dedicated my life to the industry.

So I will certainly be on the lookout for workdays when they fit into my schedule!

Be safe and have fun out there! :mrgreen:
dandruff1138
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Re: A quick thank you!

Postby Stubborn Puppet on Sun Aug 11, 2013 11:22 am

That's awesome Dan.
I would love to see you come to one of our monthly club board meetings and see where your skills as an arborist and landscaper could come in to play. One example that immediately comes to mind is erosion; we have many places around the courses out there where it would be so nice if we could find some kind of non-invasive turf or low growing foliage that could withstand the foot traffic.

As for the shoulder, I've heard that a lot of people have overcome those types of injuries (where disc golf is concerned) by just switching arms or by working on their form until it is nice and smooth. I'm no physical therapist or doctor, so I've got no qualified advice... just saying that I've heard many stories where it turned out that disc golf could still be played to full potential.

Welcome.
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Re: A quick thank you!

Postby dandruff1138 on Sun Aug 11, 2013 4:39 pm

Stubborn Puppet wrote:...One example that immediately comes to mind is erosion; we have many places around the courses out there where it would be so nice if we could find some kind of non-invasive turf or low growing foliage that could withstand the foot traffic...


Here is what I have noticed thus far, but just early opinions in the order of importance.

#1 One problem I have noticed on the two courses I played on is soil compaction. I have many years experience with Athletic Fields Management so I know this problem too well. On Soccerfields and football fields we would core aerate 3 times a year to compete with the pitter-patter of athletes, and still struggle. I think that would be a challenge to aerate your high traffic areas, but I honestly believe it is the most important step in controlling bare spots and erosion issues...

#2 would be soil conditioning, such as using calcined clay or sand in your soils, such as golf courses do. This would help with water retention and drainage and also assist a healthy root bed...

#3 would be a simple run through your high traffic areas with some cheap feather/meal based organic fertilizers, or even some slow release nitrogen if you don't mind some synthetics (I know we should be as environmentally friendly as possible!) This would run you about $300 a year per course, and require about 3 human-hours per application (4 per year?)

#4 plant selection, the best all around selection in my humble opinion would be perennial fescue with a bluegrass mix(90/10%.) Fescue is the most happy in the sun/shade hot or cold turf there is I fear, but it is not a native species. Bluegrass is a great as a base for filling in damaged spots. Seed would ideally be planted on a rotating bases, such as once in March, one in April, then One in August and another in September... if only one application is reasonable marh/april would be the best. I can not think of a native species that would be practical for disc golf specification. Aerating (as in #1) would also increase your weed growth as well as successful seeding, which would be fine, as any crop/growth would be better than none I suppose.

#5 Mowing Height, you are not going to like this, but mowing below 3" on any turf is stressing it and opening it up to disease and damage. I see some areas still thinking if you mow lower you mow less (Which is incorrect as lower cutting increases stress growth response and weed competition...)

#6 you are also going to dislike, and is not practical, but in golf turf management moving the pins and tees every so often is essential in reducing wear in high traffic areas...

#7 you are also going to dislike, but maybe on a Monday you could rotate a closure for the week. Close down a back or front 9 on each course for 1 week to give it what we call a rest period. (Week 1 close down JB back nine, Week 2 close down SP front nine, Week 3 close down EP back nine, Week 4 close down JB front nine, and so on...) I see some teams/clubs rotation their play which is the same mindset. Kudos!

#8 Crop management. Most turf prefers full sun. Also many trees, such as honeysuckle, shade out turf and even give off gases that kill underlying species. A simple proper pruning of trees can open some areas to more sunlight, thus increasing desired crop/turf.

#9 Irrigation, yeah I know.

Just some thoughts I had for the moment, sorry.
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Re: A quick thank you!

Postby Lazerface on Tue Aug 13, 2013 2:38 pm

I notice across the board in my disc golf travels that the parks and clubs who are responsible for installing Disc Golf Courses seem to lack the necessary knowledge and understanding of the items you have discussed. Factoring in course traffic, along with natural erosion should be one of the fundamental considerations while drawing up a design plan.

Dan, you for sure need to check out Dunegant Park in Florissant MO. The back 9 of the course is basically in an open field, and the creative minds at Gateway and the STL Disc golf club were able to create a really cool 9 holes complete with mowed fairways and OB bunkers full of what looks to be a gravel compound. I think this project is one of those that may take a lot of management in the future to keep the back 9 looking as good as it does now. You would be a great guy to take a stroll and maybe give some suggestions on how to preserve what exists and give some thoughts on how it can be improved. The state of MO has major budget issues right now and the STL Disc golf Club does a great job in improving and maintaining courses, but most all of the money comes from what are club is able to raise. That is why it would be huge to have a guy like you who can make realistic and cost effective assessments on how to keep these courses in great shape.

I am a busy guy and am not at all in the core group of STL Disc Golf members that do all this fantastic work. It is pretty much a small group of guys who get it all done. You seem like a busy guy, but just your 2 sense would be very helpful in the future.

Thanks for the input, and see you on the course.
Jim
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Re: A quick thank you!

Postby dandruff1138 on Wed Aug 14, 2013 4:51 pm

Very cool and creative solution at Dunegant, I will be sure to check it out! I am currently trying to learn as much about disc golf course maintenance/design in a short amount of time for a small top secret project. I plant on visiting many courses to get a good perspective and selfishly, play a little at the same time. Thanks for the warm welcome.
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